Tuesday 17 Sep, 2013

Off the Beaten Path: Rome

Rome, the Italian capital and one of the most heavily visited destinations in the world, is renowned for its historical and religious significance. With a population of nearly 3 million locals who call this city home, Rome is an ancient treasure of the modern world. Its history spans more than two and a half thousand years, and as such it has been crowned “The Eternal City” for its timelessness. While breathtaking landmarks such as the Colosseum and the Sistine Chapel are essential to visiting Rome, we encourage you to explore outside of Rome’s ancient wonders and discover the city’s contemporary charm.The MAXXI Museum of Contemporary Art

MAXXI Museum: Despite Rome’s reputation for historical tradition the MAXXI Museum is entirely dedicated to 21st century art. Designed by Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid, the museum has been praised for its innovative design and outdoor art installations. Parallel to Rome’s contemporary art scene, the museum exhibits are constantly evolving, making it a popular year-round attraction.

Caffé Sant’Eustachio: Finding the best café in Rome is like finding the Holy Grail (which rumor has it, was incidentally found in Rome) but many locals have labeled Caffé Sant’Eustachio the “best coffee in town.” Since 1938 Caffé Sant’Eustachio has celebrated the Italian coffee tradition and welcomed customers with an overwhelming number of choices from espresso to its famous Gran Caffé with cream. Whether you choose to enjoy your coffee at the counter or the tables outside Caffé Sant’Eustachio is the perfect caffeine boost amidst your travels in Rome.

Auditorium Parco Della Musica: This multifunctional music complex was completed in 2002 by Italian architect Renzo Piano. Since then, it has become Europe’s most visited music venue due to its vast size and musical diversity. The auditorium is comprised of three uniquely shaped music halls that host daily concerts and several music festivals annually.

San Lorenzo: Students on the move with EF can relax while also experiencing the local student culture in Rome’s San Lorenzo neighborhood. Heavily populated by students attending the nearby University La Sapienza, the neighborhood has become well known for its budget friendly student attractions. Furthermore this alternative area has become a lively home for local street artists looking to exhibit their creative talents.

piazza-navona

Photo Credit: Adam Smok

20 e 20: This small but cozy restaurant offers authentically quaint Italian meals from the appetizers to the dessert. Waiters are charismatic and more than willing to help you choose which dish to order (a tough decision, from what we hear). Dishes are made with fresh ingredients that are hand-selected by the chef and uniquely combined to create uncommon yet amazingly satisfying tastes.

Via del Pigneto: While known as a popular street market hosting merchants selling everything from food to baubles, Via del Pigneto is also where locals find solace in the heart of Rome’s bustling city center. It’s the perfect place to experience cultural immersion, whether by interacting with Italian vendors and shoppers, or just sitting back and taking in the scene.

Discover the “Eternal City” with your students. Browse all tours to Rome here.

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dicapua_franco/